words&images

some things i've thought.
some things i've seen.


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  1. If you like my photos, please vote for them!

    http://brubaker.artistswanted.org/exposure2011

     
     
  2. Alius is a beekeeper. Learn more about Haitian farmers: http://nickbrubaker.com/gates_index.html

    Alius is a beekeeper. Learn more about Haitian farmers: http://nickbrubaker.com/gates_index.html

     
     
  3. Nicodeme Pierre is a bee keeper. Check out more info on farmers in Haiti: 
http://www.nickbrubaker.com/gates_index.html

    Nicodeme Pierre is a bee keeper. Check out more info on farmers in Haiti: 

    http://www.nickbrubaker.com/gates_index.html

     
     
  4. the peace keepers blending in…

    the peace keepers blending in…

     
     
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  7. the watering hole…

    the watering hole…

     
     
  8. ain’t nothin but a party (click for larger image - awesome t-shirt)

    ain’t nothin but a party (click for larger image - awesome t-shirt)

     
     
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  11. The Lost Trees

    One of the most striking things about flying over northern Haiti is what is not there - the trees.  In the city streets you will find dozens of men pushing wheelbarrows stacked high with charcoal, remnants of the once heavily forested areas. 

    Without the protective canopy and stabilizing deep root systems of forests, soils become dangerously susceptible to landslides, heightening the potential for more ‘natural’ disasters resulting from human activity.  

    The image above was shot this morning as I travelled from Cap Haitien to Port-au-Prince.  

    Political boundaries are not often visible from the sky, however the satellite image below is of the Haiti - Dominican Republic border showing the stark contrast of forest cover. 

    Photograph courtesy NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio

     
     
  12. The beach… 

    The beach… 

     
     
  13. The ‘beach’ down the street from my hotel in northern Haiti. At one time there was a cash incentive recycling program for plastic bottles that worked miracles in keeping them off of the street and out of the water. The program was decommissioned a few years ago. 

    The ‘beach’ down the street from my hotel in northern Haiti. At one time there was a cash incentive recycling program for plastic bottles that worked miracles in keeping them off of the street and out of the water. The program was decommissioned a few years ago. 

     
     
  14. Dear Mr. Goat,
You are delicious.  However, when eating you I can’t help thinking of the food chain.  That you will eat anything, accept maybe barbed wire, is quite impressive, but what you eat is what I eat, and City Goat is not dining well.  
City Goat, if this is what you are having for lunch, I do not think I will be having City Goat for lunch.
Sincerest apologies,
The Brubaker

    Dear Mr. Goat,

    You are delicious.  However, when eating you I can’t help thinking of the food chain.  That you will eat anything, accept maybe barbed wire, is quite impressive, but what you eat is what I eat, and City Goat is not dining well. 

    City Goat, if this is what you are having for lunch, I do not think I will be having City Goat for lunch.

    Sincerest apologies,

    The Brubaker

     
     
  15. Zombie Cars

    Cars do not come to Haiti to die, they are dead on arrival. But it is here that they rise from the grave. They inch along slowly, rigidly, directionless, all the while muttering the groan of the undead.

    They are in varying states of decomposition, some minor – missing mirrors or with mismatched wheels, others major – missing windshields, hoods, and doors.

    The only way to kill a zombie car is to destroy the brain, go for the engine. Judging from the number of corpses littering the streets of Cap Haitien, there is certainly a highly trained commando corps waging war against the zombies. And they are thorough – full dismemberment is the preferred assurance of keeping the dead dead. The commandos operate in a sweep pattern, often only disabling zombies by hacking off wheels, keeping them immobile until the second regiment can finish the job.

    The local population has developed a dangerous yet symbiotic relationship with the zombies. As they unwittingly roam the broken roads, dozens of humans pile onto the backs of the zombies to hitch a ride in whatever random direction they travel. Despite sudden, jerky, stops and starts, the zombies are unable to shake the intrepid passengers and are left with no choice but to continue limping forward toward destinations unknown.